I am married to Doctor Who, Sherlock, Newsroom, OUAT, The Musketeers & Miranda

My lovers are Muse, Queen, Led Zeppelin, The Arctic Monkeys, U2 & David Bowie

And my friends are, IT Crowd, Mighty Boosh, Black Books, Never mind the Buzzcocks & anything else that has the high honor of making me laugh.

*accusingly*You: are you a bingewatcher or something?
*stares at floor* Me:yes... yes i am

  1.  

    Aaaand that’s the sound of my heart breaking into a million pieces

    (via hopelessfangirl)

    Source: permissiontogoafterhim

  2.  

    Full image link →

    (via djrockaloka)

    Source: officialezwah

  3.  

    mamalaz:

    adventuresofcesium:

    let’s all take a minute to stop and think about how Hagrid gave Harry his homemade birthday cake, told him how much he looked like his parents, and fed him sausages before he even started to explain that he was a wizard

    let’s stop to think about how his absolute first priority was to let harry know that he was loved and cared for

    Rubeus Remus Potter is what Albus Severus’ name should have been. 

    (via lastofthetimeladies)

    Source: adventuresofcesium

  4.   bookishandi:

padfootstolemycrumpet:


fuckyeahteddylupin:


Same mirror - same place - different orphan by *button-bird


*strangled cry*


NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO.
 
But also YES.
 
Because for me this is a pretty important part of the final battle. A lot of folks accused JKR of just wanting to kill people off, and Lupin and Tonks were one of the major “sins” in that category. But for me, one of the major themes of her books is vicious cycle of violence, and another is the ways ordinary people can break that cycle. It’s important that we know that Harry doesn’t stop all the pain, that he’s not the last war orphan. Just like the first War, parents and adults have to make choices, choices with consequences. 
 
Like James and Lily, Lupin and Tonks didn’t risk their lives to defeat Voldemort. They gave their lives for each other, because no one person should bear the weight of the sacrifice. They gave their lives for their son, who deserved a better world. They gave their lives for love, not for victory.
 
I think it’s important to see the ways Voldemort’s evil creates these cycles, children taken from their parents and parents taken from their children, again and again. I think it’s an important sobering note in the victory—yes, this time Voldemort is really dead, but there’s another baby this time, another infant who will never know his beautiful, wonderful parents because of Voldemort and his message of hate and violence. Another child who will grow up wondering where he came from, what his parents were like, what would be different if they were alive.
 
But it’s also beautiful that Teddy will have such a different experience. And his experience will not be different because Voldemort is “really gone.” His experience will be different because his grandmother will tell him about his brilliant mom. Because Harry will tell him about his wonderful dad. Because Harry will help him deal with his pain and loss, be a sympathetic ear who understands what it’s like to grow up without your parents. Because the Weasleys will welcome him as another grandchild, and he’ll grow up with Victoire to throw dirt at, and James as a little brother. His experience won’t be different because Harry won a war, it will be different because of love.
 
That’s the whole story of Harry Potter. Sometimes we have to fight for what’s right, but what really makes life worth living and what really changes the world isn’t magic or power or moral superiority. It’s love.

    Full image link →

    bookishandi:

    padfootstolemycrumpet:

    NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO.
     
    But also YES.
     
    Because for me this is a pretty important part of the final battle. A lot of folks accused JKR of just wanting to kill people off, and Lupin and Tonks were one of the major “sins” in that category. But for me, one of the major themes of her books is vicious cycle of violence, and another is the ways ordinary people can break that cycle. It’s important that we know that Harry doesn’t stop all the pain, that he’s not the last war orphan. Just like the first War, parents and adults have to make choices, choices with consequences.
     
    Like James and Lily, Lupin and Tonks didn’t risk their lives to defeat Voldemort. They gave their lives for each other, because no one person should bear the weight of the sacrifice. They gave their lives for their son, who deserved a better world. They gave their lives for love, not for victory.
     
    I think it’s important to see the ways Voldemort’s evil creates these cycles, children taken from their parents and parents taken from their children, again and again. I think it’s an important sobering note in the victory—yes, this time Voldemort is really dead, but there’s another baby this time, another infant who will never know his beautiful, wonderful parents because of Voldemort and his message of hate and violence. Another child who will grow up wondering where he came from, what his parents were like, what would be different if they were alive.
     
    But it’s also beautiful that Teddy will have such a different experience. And his experience will not be different because Voldemort is “really gone.” His experience will be different because his grandmother will tell him about his brilliant mom. Because Harry will tell him about his wonderful dad. Because Harry will help him deal with his pain and loss, be a sympathetic ear who understands what it’s like to grow up without your parents. Because the Weasleys will welcome him as another grandchild, and he’ll grow up with Victoire to throw dirt at, and James as a little brother. His experience won’t be different because Harry won a war, it will be different because of love.
     
    That’s the whole story of Harry Potter. Sometimes we have to fight for what’s right, but what really makes life worth living and what really changes the world isn’t magic or power or moral superiority. It’s love.

    (via rowling)

    Source: fuckyeahteddylupin

  5.  

    keptyn:

    The Most Quotable Movies Of All Time

    The Princess Bride (1987) dir. Rob Reiner

    (via hipsterinatardis)

    Source: keptyn

  6.  

    Captain Swan + my favorite scenes transitions / camera focuses

    (via nyc-serenade)

    Source: killian-comeback2me

  7.   raise-the-glass:

His lips, his lips, HIS LIPS THOUGH. AND THAT PROFILE. I CANNOT.

    Full image link →

    raise-the-glass:

    His lips, his lips, HIS LIPS THOUGH. AND THAT PROFILE. I CANNOT.

    (via glitterboots)

    Source: elevenfeathers

  8.  

    #hermione granger is in control of her own destiny even when she’s being chased by a giant snake

    This tag is just too perfect.

    (via glitterboots)

  9.   newtonandhermann:

jackpowerx:

fuckyesfeminist:

Average size mannequin with average size woman.

The problem, in one picture.

I never realized until seeing this picture that my interpretation of an average size woman has become REALLY SKEWED oh my god I wanna cry

    Full image link →

    newtonandhermann:

    jackpowerx:

    fuckyesfeminist:

    Average size mannequin with average size woman.

    The problem, in one picture.

    I never realized until seeing this picture that my interpretation of an average size woman has become REALLY SKEWED oh my god I wanna cry

    (via i-was-so-alone-i-owe-you-so-much)

    Source: fuckyesfeminist

  10.   newtonandhermann:

jackpowerx:

fuckyesfeminist:

Average size mannequin with average size woman.

The problem, in one picture.

I never realized until seeing this picture that my interpretation of an average size woman has become REALLY SKEWED oh my god I wanna cry

    Full image link →

    newtonandhermann:

    jackpowerx:

    fuckyesfeminist:

    Average size mannequin with average size woman.

    The problem, in one picture.

    I never realized until seeing this picture that my interpretation of an average size woman has become REALLY SKEWED oh my god I wanna cry

    (via i-was-so-alone-i-owe-you-so-much)

    Source: fuckyesfeminist

  11.  

    project-blackbird:

    Emily Vancamp as Sharon Carter in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

    Here’s an example of what we call a “soft no”. Sharon turns down Steve’s offer in a way that’s meant not to insult him but never actually uses the word “no”.

    Steve clearly gets the message, though, and importantly offers to leave her alone. Sharon’s comment afterwards gives him an opportunity to try again later, but he doesn’t press and respects her rejection of his company even though it’s probably hurt his feelings a bit.

    Just in case you ever wonder “What would Captain America do?”; there you go.

    (via hopelessfangirl)

    Source: reservoir-of-blood

  12.  

    tom-bakery:

    what i love the most about classic doctor group shots is that they’re always this group of funny old men and then suddenly BAM PAUL MCGANN

    i mean

    image

    one of those things is not like the others

    (via thisshipllsink)

    Source: tom-bakery

  13.  

    giraffepoliceforce:

    "You can’t just change the race of cultural icons like Captain America! It’s an important part of their identity and message!"

    Jesus: Ah yes.

    Jesus: Can’t imagine who would do that.

    Jesus: What a shame.

    (via ladysybil)

    Source: giraffepoliceforce

  14.  

    princehans-kingnothing:

    This entire movie was an emotional roller coaster but this is the scene that absolutely shattered my heart.

    (via thelawrencewelkshow)

    Source: easilyhumored

  15.  

    (via idlovetostaybutimustache)

    Source: acciomatthewdavelewis